Posts Tagged ‘reviews’

Cookbook Review: Chicago Cubs Cookbook

Thursday, August 5th, 2010

Who didn’t see this coming? The Cubs came out with a cookbook, and I bought it. Pre-ordered it even. And it just came in the mail today.

I read through it from cover-to-cover today, and I’ve got to say, I enjoyed it. The pictures are great, the recipes are enticing, and it’s all for a great cause: to benefit the Dempster Family Foundation.

The recipes come from all over the Cubs universe, from players past and present (and even future!), the coaching staff, the broadcast booth, and even some Cubs-friendly Chicago restaurants who happily shared some top-secret recipes in the name of charity. I haven’t had the chance to make anything from the book yet, but I’m looking forward to trying a number of these dishes.

There’s also plenty of Cubs trivia and Wrigley Field history tucked into these 124 pages, making it a fun read for just about any Cubs fan.

I only see two drawbacks, and they’re minor. One, as you’ll see below, there are multiple recipes for some of the same dishes. Two for crab cakes. Three for meatloaf. I know this isn’t a traditional cookbook, but I’d still prefer a little more variety. Two, the book is bound with a plastic spiral, which I know is common in cookbooks, but I’m not a fan. It gets bent weird and twisty. I’d prefer a regular binding. (Neither of these are deal-breakers!)

It’s for a good cause, so Cubs fans should do their part and buy this fun book. You’ll be glad you did.

Chicago Cubs Cookbook: All-Star Recipes from Your Favorite Players

The book starts with a foreword from Tom Ricketts, an Introduction to Riley Dempster and the Dempster Family Foundation, and a short history of food at Wrigley Field. The first three recipes in the book are striaght from the concession stands, provided by Levy Restaurants.

From the Friendly Confines:

  1. House-made Black Bean Veggie Burgers
  2. How to Build the PERFECT Chicago Dog
  3. Signature Crab Cakes with Lemon Aioli

Leading Off: Appetizers

  1. Mike Fontenot: Bacon-Wrapped Duck Breast
  2. Rudy Jaramillo: Baked Herbed Cream Cheese en Croute
  3. Randy Wells’ Hot Wing Dip

Pinch Hitters: Side Dishes

  1. Cubs Clubhouse: Yogurt Mashed Potatoes
  2. John Grabow’s Loaded Mashed Potatoes
  3. Pat Hughes: Grilled Asparagus with Garlic
  4. Len Kasper: Mother Kasper’s Slow-Cooker Stuffing
  5. Greg Maddux: Rosebud Restaurants Jalapeno Hash Browns
  6. Dave Keller: Blue Adobe Grille Green Chile Potato
  7. Alan Trammell: Twin Anchors Restaurant & Tavern Pepper Jack Creamed Spinach
  8. Carlos Zambrano: My Arepa Caraotas Black Beans

Heart of the Order: Main Courses

  1. Jeff Baker’s Mom’s Chicken Cordon Bleu
  2. Mike Bielecki: Protein Thai Noodles
  3. Ernie Banks: Harry Caray’s Tallgrass Meatloaf
  4. Maron & Andrea Byrd’s Baked Ziti
  5. Andrew Cashner: Grandma Pat’s Meatballs
  6. Tyler Colvin: Molly’s CHicken Broccoli Casserole
  7. Connie’s Pizza: Pizza Soup
  8. Ivan DeJesus: Pastelon de Amarillos
  9. Ryan Dempster: D’Agostino’s Grilled Chicken Parmesan
  10. Ryan Dempster: Hub 51 Broiled Sea Bass in Horseradish Broth
  11. The Fifty/50 Skirt Steak Sandwich
  12. Kosuke Fukodome: Hiro Aoyama’s Ginger Pork
  13. Jeff Gray: Southwestern Turkey Burgers & Sweet Potato Fries
  14. Pat Hughes: Caramelized Plank Salmon
  15. Jim Hendry: Crawfish Etouffee
  16. Jim Hendry: Chicken & Sausage Gumbo
  17. Koyie & Meghan Hill’s Pork Stew
  18. Hub 51: Build-Your-Own Steak Tacos
  19. Brett Jackson: Buffalo Spaghetti Squash Pasta
  20. Ted Lilly: Egg in the Hole
  21. Fergie Jenkins: Bagged Pheasant
  22. Derrek Lee: Wildfire Parmesan-Crusted Filet
  23. Ted Lilly: Stanley’s King of Chilis
  24. Sean Marshall: Sarah’s Mom’s Masterpiece Meatloaf
  25. Carmelo Martinez: Locrio de Pollo
  26. Lou Piniella: Anita Piniella’s Layered Chicken Salad
  27. Corey Miller: Corey & Maria’s CHicken Pasta
  28. N9NE Steakhouse: Ahi Tuna Tartare
  29. Lou Mitchel’s: Grilled Thick French Toast
  30. Xavier & Meredith Nady’s Meatloaf
  31. Mike Quade: Pecan-Crusted Snook with Cajun Cream Sauce
  32. Aramis Ramierz: Harry Caray’s Jumbo Lump Crab Cakes
  33. Larry Rothschild: Wildfire Spit-Roasted Herb Chicken
  34. Ryne Sandberg: Margaraet Sandberg’s Chicken Tacos
  35. Ryne Sandberg: Harry Caray’s Rigatoni with Vodka Sauce
  36. Carlos Silva: Arepas
  37. Ryan Theriot: Chicken & Sausage Jambalaya
  38. Alfonso Soriano & Carlos Marmol: Mangu
  39. Geovany Soto: Arroz Con Gandules
  40. Geovany Soto: Harry Caray’s Bone-In Chicken Vesuvio
  41. Chad Tracy: Vinegar Grilled Chicken
  42. Steve Trout: Pan-Fried Trout
  43. Billy Williams: Sweet-Swingin’ Billy’s Grilled Pork Chops
  44. Carlos Zambrano: My Arepa Carne Desmechada

Extra Innings: Desserts

  1. Cubs Clubhouse: Peanut Butter Protein Truffles
  2. Sam Fuld: Carrot Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting
  3. Tom Gorzelanny: Grandma Ruby’s Oreo Cookie Balls
  4. Jim Hendry: Fig Cake
  5. Jim Hendry: Pecan Praline
  6. Micha Hoffpauir: Grandma Ernestine Adams’ Blonde Brownies
  7. Rudy Jaramillo: Cola Cake
  8. The Rickets Family: Cut-Out Vanilla Almond Cookies
  9. Len Kasper: Apple Crisp
  10. Jeff Stevens: Christina’s Banana Nut Bread
  11. Ryan Theriot: Joe’s Havana Dream Pie


The Girl and the Goat: Worth the Wait

Tuesday, July 27th, 2010

As you’ve probably noticed if you’ve been following the blog at all, if I have a favorite celebrity chef, it’s got to be Stephanie Izard. She won season 4 of Bravo’s Top Chef to become the first (and so far only!) female Top Chef. She’s from Chicago. And ever since she won “$100,000 to help make her culinary dreams a reality, furnished by the Glad family of products,” I’ve been waiting impatiently for her restaurant to open.

If you remember, we got the chance to meet Stephanie at a little get together at her house, thanks to a contest in the RedEye. And you may or may not know that David and I traipsed all over the city trying to get our hands on tiny little goat buttons, hoping to win tickets to a premiere party for the new restaurant. The whole goat button thing didn’t really work out for us, but David was kind enough to make us reservations after the restaurant opened a couple of weeks ago.

Here’s my rundown:

The decor

The restaurant has high ceilings, and a kind of rustic decor. The kitchen is open, and you can see Stephanie hard at work with the whole kitchen staff. We sat in the center of the floor, so had a good view of the kitchen and the bar. The kitchen is dominated by huge wood-burning ovens–the better to wood-fire some pizzas, my dear. Overall, the restaurant has a comfortable feel. The servers were dressed in jeans and sneakers, which is fine by me, but the patrons were fairly over-dressed for the decor, on the whole. Probably because of the whole new-and-trendy aspect.

The linens were minimal, and in keeping with the rustic feel of the space. Water is served in re-purposed wine bottles, which looked cool, but didn’t exactly keep the water cold.

P.S. We had a decent view of the kitchen, but the restaurant layout has two two-seater tables actually IN the kitchen, so if you want to spend your date that close to the fire, try to reserve one of those spots! I tried not to geek out about seeing Stephanie at work in the kitchen, but we saw that at least one women went up and got her menu autographed, so I guess she’s used to the attention by now.

The drinks

I really should let David tell you about this, since he was the one to order a drink. The bar menu was loaded with great wine selections, by the bottle or the glass, something like 30 different craft beer options, and some very meticulously designed mixed drinks. David ordered something called a “Smoking Jacket,” which featured smoked bourbon or something of the sort. I didn’t taste any, but he enjoyed it. His only “objection” is that it was probably the first pink-colored drink he’s ever ordered in public. We didn’t expect it to come out pink!

The food

This, of course, is what we came for.

Everything is served as small plates, and they recommend two to three plates per person. The menu is sorted into Veggie, Fish, and Meat sections, though as our server warned us, those aren’t strict categories. He offered to make accommodations if we were vegetarians, but as a couple of carnivores, we weren’t too worried. We skipped the oyster selections (we felt brave, but not that brave) and started instead with the “veggie” version of the bread, which was a fresh-baked loaf served with chimichurri and sweet onion butter. All delicious.

From the Veggie plates section, we chose a salad made with fresh mozzarella, yellow cherry tomatoes, and yellow plums. These were served over greens with a vinaigrette and a cilantro-herb paste. Very tasty. And our server told us that that particular dish made the menu that day because Stephanie had been inspired by the cheese and tomatoes at the Green City Market that morning, which was a nice touch.

From the Fish section, I ordered seared scallops, served with braised veal and caponata over marcona almond butter. It was awesome. David’s not a seafood fan, so I didn’t even have to share, but I did get him to try a bite. Even he agreed it was kind of tasty. The scallops were seared perfectly, with an awesome crust on each side. Nestled between the scallops was a very flavorful tender veal. I would order the veal on it’s own any day. The saltiness of the veal, the creaminess of the almond butter, and the subtle sweetness of the scallop melded together perfectly. Can we go back yet? I want this dish again! (If you’re not familiar, caponata is a kind of vegetable salad. Don’t worry, I had to look it up, too. I’m not sure exactly what was in Stephanie’s, but it was very tasty, and definitely added to the dish texturally).

From the Meat section, we ordered two plates: ham frites, with swiss cheese dipping sauce and a sun-dried tomato aioli for dipping, and a skirt steak with pickles, beets, carrots, and cilantro over a salted goat’s milk caramel sauce. The ham frites were basically bacon french fries, and they were as delicious as that sounds. Yes, they were glorified cheese fries, and yes, every bite was delicious. The skirt steak was cooked perfectly (for David–I’m one to over-cook my meat, but I know he was pleased). I enjoyed the pickles so much more than I expected, and the carrots were crunchy and sweet, but my favorite part was the caramel sauce. It was an unexpected sweetness, but a great contrast to all of the other flavors.

Then came dessert. On the one hand, we were stuffed. On the other hand, we were intrigued by most of the selections on the menu. We ended up ordering something called a fudgecicle. It was aptly name, as the foundation of the dessert was frozen chocolate mousse that tasted like a fudgecicle, but with so much more depth. The fudge mousse was topped with a sweet wafer, which was in turn topped with…Olive Oil Gelato. A couple of spoonfuls of a warm sauce made of Dragon’s Milk stout and other goodies softened the frozen bits around the edges and brought all of the flavors together perfectly. And I’m not a beer fan, by any stretch.

P.S. About that gelato: David and I were amazed by the flavor. I can’t describe it to you except to say that it tastes exactly like it sounds, really, but also, so much better than it sounds. Sweet, creamy, with a clean, clear taste of olive oil. I might not have predicted beforehand that I’d like such a thing, but I can tell you now that it was delicious. I’d absolutely order the dessert again.

The conclusion

Can you tell I was pleased? We both were. I don’t think we were disappointed by anything we tried, and we saw a lot of tasty-looking dishes being served to our neighbors as well. Much of what was on the menu was outside of our comfort zone, but in the end, I think that’s what made it fun. I feel like I expanded my culinary horizons, and had an excellent meal. Our server was knowledgeable and attentive. The atmosphere was welcoming. The food, obviously, was excellent. And we were pleasantly surprised at the tab—-after a drink, a starter, two plates each, and a shared dessert, we managed to spend less than $100, including tip. That’s more than we spend on most Wednesday nights, sure, but well worth it. Considering I’ve been psyched for this meal for about 6 months now, as I followed Stephanie on Twitter and waited for the restaurant to open, I’d say our meal was definitely a success. I had high hopes, and I wasn’t disappointed.

And even though I would order any of these dishes again the next time we go back, I’m excited to know that the menu will change often, and that the next trip could be a completely different meal. That’ll be worth the wait, too.

The details

Girl and the Goat; 809 W Randolph St, Chicago IL; Cost: Varies, menu is small plates, two to three plates per person are recommended, and range in price from $6-$17/plate.

Restaurant Review: Homemade Pizza Company

Sunday, June 28th, 2009

We picked up a pizza from Homemade Pizza Company again tonight. There’s one close to our place in Chicago (they have a few storefronts scattered throughout the city), and a couple of weeks ago, after a long Sunday afternoon spent cleaning this place, we decided that we deserved pizza for dinner and tried it out.

And tonight, we went back again.

Homemade Pizza does “Take and Bake” pizzas, a concept that I was never quite sold on before. Basically they roll out a pizza crust, load it with your choice of toppings, and then you take it home and bake it in your own oven. I always wondered why, really, you’d want to bother baking your own pizza. And I thought that your home oven never quite managed to make pizza as well as a big restaurant pizza oven. Homemade Pizza has me convinced though.

I love their ingredients. They use all-natural, high-quality stuff to make their pizzas, and offer a huge variety of toppings while they’re at it. We ordered a pizza with Asiago cheese in addition to the mozzarella that’s traditional, and topped it with sausage and canadian bacon. It was delicious. The Asiago cheese is a little saltier and a little more tangy than the bland mozzarella most pizza places toss on their pizzas. The sausage had a good flavor, and they use whole slices of canadian bacon, which I had never seen before, but approve of completely. The crust wasn’t too thick or too thin and baked up very nicely.

They boast the #1 cheese pizza in town with their Four Cheese special and I’m certainly excited to try it sometime: Asiago, Fontinella, Wisconsin Mozzarella, and Ricotta. Yum!

The menu also includes a several tasty looking salads and even take-and-bake cookie dough, to bake up a hot, fresh cookie at home.

Check out the menu yourself. Most of their combinations sound delicious, actually, even when they contain ingredients that I’m not that crazy about.

Their prices seemed pretty reasonable as well. A large pizza will run you about $18, so it’s more expensive than frozen pizza, but in line with any decent pizza restaurant that will deliver to you. And they don’t charge for delivery (obviously, since you pick it up yourself!). 😉 They seem to make coupons available fairly often, and have a club card program that allows you to earn a free pizza after so many purchases.

Bottom Line: I expect we’ll take advantage of this place being so close fairly often. Since it’s close by, it’s actually faster than getting a deep dish pizza delivered, and will be a nice weeknight option, for those nights when you just don’t want to cook a meal from scratch.

Cooking Class Review: Pasta Workshop

Wednesday, March 18th, 2009

I finally got around to taking that Pasta class at The Chopping Block. If you remember, part of my Christmas gift from David was my choice of cooking classes from The Chopping Block, a culinary school for home cooks here in Chicago.

I was anxious to take this pasta class in particular because I also received the pasta rolling and cutting attachments for my KitchenAid mixer for Christmas from my parents.

I really enjoyed the class. The Chopping Block’s kitchen is spacious and well-stocked, and these hands on classes are really fun. You start with the recipes for the day, and given instructions to prepare each ingredient as you go. All of the ingredients for each dish are brought to you station and everything is cleared for you, which adds to the fun (who wants to clean up?). The equipment is plentiful, high-end, and in good shape.

For this Pasta Workshop (which seems to be revamped every so often to include seasonal ingredients) we learned to make regular egg pasta dough and spinach pasta dough to start. Then we rolled out and cut our own pasta and used them to make three different dishes: Spinach Fettuccine with Prosciutto & Peas; Artichoke, Sun-Dried Tomato, & Pesto Lasagna; and Ricotta Stuffed Tortelloni with Mushrooms, Asparagus & Parmesan Cheese.

The Fettuccine dish came together really quickly. We basically crisped up the proscuitto, added cream, and reduced it for about 10 minutes to thicken the sauce. At the end, we tossed in a cup of fresh peas, sliced roasted red peppers, and some parmesan cheese, along with the cooked spinach fettuccine. Yum.

The Lasagna was a little dry, actually, but that would be easy enough to correct next time. For one, our teammates messed up the layers a little bit, and the top layer didn’t have any sauce on top of the final layer of pasta. For two, the pesto they had us make was extra thick, and a thinner sauce would have helped. For three, there wasn’t enough ricotta or mozzarella for my tastes. That being said, I have some good ideas for making this dish to my liking, and I’ve never liked a vegetarian lasagna so much.

The tortelloni wasn’t perfect either, but again, our teammates forgot to salt the water for the pasta, so that was a large part of it. I also think they may have undercooked the pasta just a little bit so that the filling didn’t have time to meld. Finally, I am not a fan of asparagus. Losing the asparagus would improve the dish a lot for me.

We finished up everything with about 1/2 an hour to spare, and sat down to eat a delicious lunch. The Chopping Block provides wine pairing options as well, and though I didn’t have a glass yesterday, I appreciate the option.

Finally, I love that The Chopping Block offers discounts in the store following every class. They give students 10% off on anything in the store after a class, or 15% on anything you used during your class. There are so many tempting things in that store for me, it’s kind of a dangerous offer, but I managed to control myself and just bought a cookbook.

I really enjoyed the class, and I can’t wait to take my next one.

One last note: My dad came with me this time, and I think he enjoyed the class, but I can say for sure that I enjoyed it more than I would have being there alone. Most people seemed to have a friend along, and there was a lot of group work going on, much moreso than with the knife skills class. If anyone out there is interested in going to one of these classes, let me know. I’d love to have a buddy go with me!

Cookbook Review: Think Like a Chef by Tom Colicchio

Monday, March 16th, 2009

As the name suggests, Tom Colicchio’s Think Like a Chef isn’t just a collection of recipes. Like the name says, Collicchio has set out to demonstrate how a true chef makes dinner: not from a written recipe or list of ingredients, but from a quality ingredient and inspiration.

think_like_a_cheft_book_jacket

The overarching theme of the book is one I hear him reference over and over again as head judge on Top Chef, mainly that when you taste great food, you know that it’s coming from someone who cares about food, thought about the ingredients, and really put their heart into it. And yes, that sounds a little bit like Carla “putting the love” in her food, but I think it goes deeper than that. For Collicchio, being a chef means respecting the ingredients enough to use the proper technique to make them shine.

The book opens with something of a memior, as Collicchio describes the development of his culinary career, with special care to show how his background and family shaped the chef he ultimately became. The early food chapters describe some very basic techniques (pan roasting, braising, blanching, stock-making, and sauce-making) that are building blocks for any asipring cook. Collichio explains them well, breaking them down step by step, and illustrating with gorgeous, uncomplicated recipes designed to teach by doing, and really inspire you to get in the kitchen and start trying them out.

The following chapters focus on the ingredients (as Collichio’s cooking does) and gives you a glimpse into how Tom’s recipes must develop. A chapter on Roasted Tomatoes, for example, teaches you what to look for in quality tomatoes (apparently, “Everybody knows the best tomatoes come from New Jersey”), how to roast your carefully chosen tomatoes, and then five different recipes that showcase these roasted tomatoes. The best part of this approach is that you turn the page at the end of this section imagining what else you might do with roasted tomatoes.

And that, I’m sure, is the point.

This book is beautifully photographed, and a pleasure to read. And even though many of the recipes use ingredients that aren’t often found in my humble home kitchen, they inspire me to expand my culinary repiortare ever-so-slightly. I guess you might say they inspire me to “think like a chef.” Go figure.

The book includes a foreword by Danny Meyer, and a preface and introduction from Collichio himself, and concludes with a resources section, as well as a detailed index. In between, you’ll find the following sections and recipes:

1. Techniques:

  • Roasting (Roasted Chicken, Pan-Roasted Striped Bass, Pan-Roasted Sirloin, Roasted Herbed Leg of Lamb, Salt-Roasted Salmon, Pan-Roasted Sweetbreads, Pan-Roasted Soft Shell Crabs with Pickled Ramps and Creme Fraiche, Pan-Roasted Lobster with Bay Leaf, Pan-Roasted Salsify)
  • Braising (Braised Short Ribs, Braised Beef Cheeks, Braised Fresh “Bacon,” Braised Red Snapper)
  • Blanching
  • Stock-Making (White Chicken Stock, Brown Chicken Stock, Lobster Stock, Veal Stock)
  • Sauce-Making (Beurre Fondue, Beurre Blanc, Apple Cider Sauce, Basic Vinaigrette, Tomato Vinaigrette, Lemon-Rosemare Vinaigrette)

2. Studies

  • Roasted Tomatoes (Roasted Tomatoes & Garlic, Roasted Tomato, Zucchini, and Eggplant Lasagne, Roasted Tomato Risotto, Clam Ragout with Pancetta, Roasted Tomatoes, and Mustard Greens, Sea Bass Stuffed with Roasted Tomatoes, Seared Tuna with Roasted Tomato Vinaigrette and Fennel Salad, Braised Lamb Shanks with Roasted Tomato, Caramelized Tomato Tarts)
  • Mushrooms (Pan roasted Mushrooms, Roasted Sea Scallops with Mushrooms, Marinated Mushrooms, Salmon Braised with Mushrooms, Polenta Gratiin with Mushroom “Bolognese,” Pan-Roasted Quail with Swiss Chard and Mushrooms, Caramelized Mushroom Tarts)
  • Braised Artichokes (Artichokes Braised in Olive Oil and White Wine, Artichoke Salad, Artichoke Vinaigrette, Oricchiette with Artichokes, Cabbage, and Cranberry Beans, Artichoke Ravioli with Artichokes, Peas, and Asparagus, Quick-Braised Striped Bass with Artichoke and Zucchini, Slow-Braised Chicken with Artichokes, Artichoke & Tomato Gratin)

3. Trilogies

  • Asparagus, Ramps, & Morels (Ragout of Asparagus, Ramps, and Morels, Baked Free-Form “Ravioli” with Asparagus, Ramps, and Morels, Sole with Morelss, Ramps, and Asparagus, Asparagus Soup with Morel Custard, Pan-Roasted Poussin with Morels, Ramps, and Asparagus, Morel, Ramp, and Potato Gratin)
  • Lobster, Peas, & Pasta (Basic Boiled Lobster, Fettuccini with Lobster and Peas, Basic Pasta Dough, Chilled Pea Soup, with Lobster, Pasta, and Pea Salad, Spiced Roasted Lobster with Pea Ravioli, Lobster Risotto with Peas, Lobster Spice, Lobster Butter)
  • Duck, Root Vegetables, & Apples (Roasted Duck, Root Vegetables, and Apples, Braised Duck with Apples, Root Vegetable and Apple Ragout with Duck Crepes, Basic Crepes, Duck Confit, Root Vegetable Soup with Apples and Duck Ham, Duck Ham, Duck Rillettes, Duck, Root Vegetable, and Apple Terrine)

4. Component Cooking

  • Spring Vegetables (Pickled Ramps, Pan-Roasted Ramps, Pan-Roasted Spring Onions, Rhubarb Chutney, Fava Bean and Pecorino Salad with Prosciutto, Swiss Chard Cannelloni with Chanterelle Sauce, Pan-Roasted Asparagus)
  • Summer Vegetables (Summer Vegetable Ragout, Ratatouille, Eggplant Caviar, Pan-Fried Eggplant, Corn Relish, Corn Chowder, Creamless Creamed Corn, Corn and Potato Pancakes, Zucchini with Lemon Thyme, Pan-Roasted Zucchini, Pan-Fried Zucchini Blossoms, Pickled Watermelon Rind, Tomato Consomme, Green Tomato Chutney, Pepper Chutney)
  • Fall Vegetables (Braised Red Cabbage, Roasted Savoy Cabbage with Raisins, Roasted Endive with Whole Spices, Glazed Endive Leaves, Endive Chutney, Onion Confit, Honey-Glazed Onions, Puree of Onion Soup, Onion Marmalade, Balsamic Onion Marmalade, Potato, Leek, and Bacon Pan-Fry, Diced Potato-Leek Soup, Roasted Potatoes, Leeks, and Bacon, Boulangerie Potatoes, Brussels Sprouts with Bacon)

5. A Few Favorites

  • (Lentils, Foie Gras Terrine, Poached Foie Gras, Pan-Fried Oysters, Cured Salmon, Lemon Confit, Cannellini Beans, My Favorite Chicken Soup)

In conclusion, I would recommend Tom Colicchio’s Think Like A Chef for the ambitious home cook or growing foodie. The book is well-written, and full of information about Colicchio and his personal style of cooking. I think  most anyone whould have osmething to leanr here, but if you’re skittish in the kitchen, you’ll probably be intimidated by a lot of these recipes. I, personally, am excited to try a number of these dishes. I picked up the paperback version of the book, which is well worth the $15-20 price tag.