Posts Tagged ‘pork tenderloin’

Hoisin and Bourbon Glazed Pork Tenderloin

Thursday, June 17th, 2010

Still grilling. ūüėÄ

Our next grilling adventure was this awesome pork tenderloin recipe. It couldn’t have been easier to prep or to cook, and the ingredients are things that we keep on hand. (You should keep most of these on hand too, they all have a lot of uses).

The pork cooked up juicy and tender, and the sauce was perfect–just enough sweetness to pick up that great charred grilled flavor.

Hoisin & Bourbon Glazed Pork Tenderloin

  • 1/3¬† cup¬† hoisin sauce
  • 2¬† tablespoons¬† seasoned rice vinegar
  • 2¬† tablespoons¬† bourbon
  • 2¬† tablespoons¬† maple syrup
  • 1 1/2¬† teaspoons¬† grated peeled fresh ginger
  • 1 1/2¬† teaspoons¬† fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper paste
  • 1¬† garlic clove, minced
  • 2¬† (1-pound) pork tenderloins, trimmed
  • 1/2¬† teaspoon¬† salt
  • 1/2¬† teaspoon¬† freshly ground black pepper
  • Cooking spray

Prepare grill.

Combine hoisin sauce and next 7 ingredients (hoisin through garlic) in a small bowl; stir with a whisk.

Slice pork lengthwise, cutting to, but not through, other side. Open halves, laying pork flat. Sprinkle pork with salt and pepper.¬† Place pork on grill rack coated with cooking spray; cook 5 minutes. Turn and baste pork with hoisin mixture; cook 5 minutes. Turn and baste pork with hoisin mixture; cook 5 minutes or until pork reaches 155¬į or desired degree of doneness. Let stand 5 minutes; cut pork into 1/2-inch slices.

Note: Hoisin sauce is one of my favorite go-to ingredients. The spiced Chinese sauce can be found in the Asian section of almost any supermarket. It’s a thick paste made with miso, soy sauce, garlic, and seasonings, and adds a really authentic flavor to a lot of chinese dishes. I add it to pepper steak, stir fry recipes, and all kinds of things.

Here’s another tip–keep a chunk of ginger in the freezer. Even though it’s cheap, it always annoyed me to buy a big chunk of fresh ginger root and hardly make a dent in it before it went bad. Instead, we keep the chunk in a ziploc back in the freezer. I just grate up what I need with a microplane grater and keep the rest. This lets us use fresh ginger all the time, without it ever going to waste.

This recipe, from May 2002’s Cooking Light, suggests the addition of hickory chips to your grill, to get the additional smoky flavor. Since the reviews on the wood chip portion of the recipe were mixed on their website, and and since we didn’t have any hickory chips on hand anyway, I decided to skip it. Maybe we’ll try it next time. I suppose if I haven’t tried it, I can’t know what I was missing, but the pork was tender and flavorful without it. It certainly isn’t required.

Pork Tenderloin with Mustard Sauce

Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010

This very tasty dish from Cooking Light magazine turned out to be both simple and yummy–plus had a kind of fancy look to it as well. I think this could absolutely be served for entertaining.

The pork slices were tender, and the sauce was tangy and delicious. Our roommate Leah isn’t a fan of mustard, but she still enjoyed this sauce. It was so good, I was glad the noodles were there to soak up every last drop. It would also be good over mashed potatoes.

Pork Tenderlion with Mustard Sauce
Adapted from Cooking Light, October 2001

Ingredients

  • 2 cups uncooked medium egg noodles
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 (1-pound) pork tenderloin, trimmed and cut crosswise into 12 (1-inch-thick) slices
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 3 tablespoons whole-grain Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch

Directions:

Cook noodles according to package directions, omitting salt and fat; drain.

While the noodles cook, heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Sprinkle the pork with pepper and salt. Place pork in pan; cook 5 minutes, turning once.

Combine the wine and mustard; pour into pan. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 10 minutes. Remove pork from pan; keep warm.

Combine water and cornstarch in a small bowl. Stir cornstarch mixture into pan; bring to a boil, and cook 1 minute or until thick. Serve pork with sauce and noodles.

Calories: 242, Fat: 8g, Fiber: 1 g