Posts Tagged ‘mustard’

Pioneer Woman’s Sloppy Joes

Tuesday, January 11th, 2011

Ah, that Pioneer Woman. Everything over there is delicious. I don’t usually consider her food to be terribly original or inventive, just a really great solid version of whatever she’s trying to make. That’s what you get with these sloppy joes. If you’ve never made sloppy joes “from scratch” and have been relying on a mix or a can, you’re definitely in for a treat. The flavors are brighter, there’s just the right amount of spice, and browning the buns with butter is a great, simple touch that really makes a difference.

(If you have made sloppy joes from scratch, there’s probably not anything earth shattering about this recipe. My family used ketchup, mustard, and brown sugar to make their sauce, and this is certainly in that family. But the onion & bell pepper adds something to the mix, as does the fresh garlic.) This recipe is extremely flexible though, so you can leave out pretty much any of the ingredients that you don’t care for.

photo courtesy of thepioneerwoman.com

Sloppy Joes a la Pioneer Woman
Serves 8; Adapted from thepioneerwoman.com

  • 2 Tablespoons Butter
  • 2-½ pounds Ground Beef
  • ½ Large White or Yellow Onion, Diced
  • ½ Large Green Bell Pepper, Diced
  • 5 cloves Garlic, Minced
  • 1-½ cups Ketchup
  • 1 cup Water
  • 2 Tablespoons Brown Sugar
  • 2 teaspoons Chili Powder (or use more or less to taste)
  • 1 teaspoon Dry Mustard
  • ½ teaspoon Crushed Red Pepper Flakes (or use more or less to taste)
  • Worcestershire Sauce, To Taste
  • 2 Tablespoons Tomato Paste (optional)
  • Tabasco Sauce (optional; to taste)
  • Salt To Taste
  • Freshly Ground Black Pepper, to taste
  • Kaiser Rolls, Hamburger Buns, or other soft sandwich rolls
  • Butter

Preparation Instructions

Add two tablespoons of butter to a large skillet or dutch oven over medium high heat. Add ground beef and cook until brown. Drain most of the fat and discard.

Add onions, green pepper, and garlic. Cook for 3-4 minutes, or until vegetables begin to get soft.

Add ketchup, brown sugar, chili pepper, dry mustard, and water. Stir to combine and simmer for 15 minutes, adding salt and pepper to taste. Also add tomato paste, Worcestershire, and Tabasco if desired. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed.

To prepare the buns:

Spread both halves of each bun with butter and brown on a griddle or skillet. Spoon meat mixture over the rolls. Serve hot.

Pork Tenderloin with Mustard Sauce

Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010

This very tasty dish from Cooking Light magazine turned out to be both simple and yummy–plus had a kind of fancy look to it as well. I think this could absolutely be served for entertaining.

The pork slices were tender, and the sauce was tangy and delicious. Our roommate Leah isn’t a fan of mustard, but she still enjoyed this sauce. It was so good, I was glad the noodles were there to soak up every last drop. It would also be good over mashed potatoes.

Pork Tenderlion with Mustard Sauce
Adapted from Cooking Light, October 2001

Ingredients

  • 2 cups uncooked medium egg noodles
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 (1-pound) pork tenderloin, trimmed and cut crosswise into 12 (1-inch-thick) slices
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 3 tablespoons whole-grain Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch

Directions:

Cook noodles according to package directions, omitting salt and fat; drain.

While the noodles cook, heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Sprinkle the pork with pepper and salt. Place pork in pan; cook 5 minutes, turning once.

Combine the wine and mustard; pour into pan. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 10 minutes. Remove pork from pan; keep warm.

Combine water and cornstarch in a small bowl. Stir cornstarch mixture into pan; bring to a boil, and cook 1 minute or until thick. Serve pork with sauce and noodles.

Calories: 242, Fat: 8g, Fiber: 1 g

Broccoli Cheddar Soup from 101 Cookbooks

Monday, November 30th, 2009

I made a broccoli cheddar soup recipe that I found on another blog, 101 Cookbooks. Though I, personally, am not very fond of broccoli, my husband is a fan. So is our roommate.

Plus, after Thanksgiving, I had another pound of fresh leftover broccoli, and I wanted to use it up.

The recipe looked so pretty. And I was excited about the croutons (which I may have made out of leftover dinner rolls…we are all about the leftovers this week). It also didn’t use velveeta or heavy cream, unlike most of the broccoli cheese soup recipes I came across. Plus, we had a bunch of leftover cheddar, too. This seemed like a place that all that cheese could shine.

The good news is, the cheese did shine in this soup, by the time I was done. If you like broccoli, the original recipe–found here–might very well be your new favorite soup. But me? I had to just about triple the amount of cheese in the soup to make it palatable. I guess that’s what I get for trying to stay on the healthy side of a broccoli cheese soup. The recipe below is what I ended up making. It’s full of delicious, cheesy goodness.

brocchedar

Broccoli Cheddar Soup
Adapted from 101 Cookbooks; serves 4-6

For the croutons:

  • 5-6 ounce chunk of bread, cut or torn into 1-inch pieces (About 3 cups)
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons whole grain mustard
  • 1/4 teaspoon fine grain sea salt 

For the soup:

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 large potato, peeled and cut into 1/4-inch cubes (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 1/2 cups chicken or vegetable broth (I used chicken)
  • 1 large head of broccoli (12 ounces or 3/4 lb.), cut into small florets
  • 2 cups freshly grated aged Cheddar, plus more for grating over the top
  • 2 teaspoons whole grain mustard, to taste
  • 1/2 cup sour cream or creme fraiche (optional)

Preheat your oven to 350F degrees and place the bread chunks in a large bowl. In a small bowl, whisk together the mustard, olive oil, and salt, and pour this mixture over the bread pieces.  Toss to coat, then spread the bread out on a baking sheet and bake for 10 – 15 minutes, or until the croutons are golden and crunchy.

While the croutons are toasting heat the remaining olive oil over medium high heat. Stir in the onion and sprinkle with salt. Saute for about two minutes minutes. Next, stir in the diced potatoes, cover, and cook for about four minutes, until the potatoes are fork tender. Uncover, add the minced garlic and chicken broth. Bring to a boil, check to make sure the potatoes are completely cooked. Once the potatoes are soft enough to eat, stir in the broccoli. Simmer just long enough for the broccoli to get tender throughout, 2 – 4 minutes. The broccoli will turn a lovely bright green color in the pot.

Immediately remove the soup from heat and puree with an immersion blender. Add the two cups of cheddar cheese and the dijon mustard, if using. Stir in about 1/2 a cup of sour cream or creme fraiche. You can adjust the thickness off the soup by adding more water or broth.

Serve sprinkled with croutons and shredded cheese.

Maple-Mustard Roast Pork Chops with Roasted Yukon Gold Potatoes

Thursday, February 26th, 2009

This recipe is from “Everyday with Rachael Ray.” Sort of. It’s actually taken from the magazine’s “No Recipe Zone” feature, which lists ingredients and outlines a general method, but doesn’t specify quantities or procedure like a regular recipe would. This month’s article is called “Let’s Roast!” and the result is a pork roast flavored with maple syrup, mustard, and fresh herbs with roasted potatoes.

Because it was a weeknight, in real Rachael Ray style, I subbed pork loin chops for the whole pork loin to shorten the cook time. Otherwise, everything was pretty much the same. Both the pork and the potatoes turned out well. The potatoes were very tasty. The pork was good, not great, but I’ll probably give this one another chance. They suggest marinating the pork for at least an hour, but I only had time for half an hour or so. The flavor would’ve been better for sure if the pork had more time to marinate.

Maple-Mustard Roast Pork Chops with Roasted Yukon Gold Potatoes
Adapted from Every Day with Rachael Ray (February 2009)

  • 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary, plus 6 sprigs
  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 4 pork loin chops, 1 1/2 inch thick (About 1 1/2 pounds)
  • 4 slices bacon
  • 6 yukon gold potatoes
  • salt and pepper

1. In a ziploc bag, mix together 2 tablespoons olive oil, the mustard, maple syrup, chopped rosemary and garlic. Add the pork and turn in the mixture to coat; refrigerate for at least 1 hour or overnight.

2. Preheat the oven to 375°. Place the rosemary sprigs in the center of a roasting pan. Place the marinated pork chops on top of the rosemary. Cut the bacon slices in half and top each pork chop with two half slices.

3. Scatter the potatoes around the pork and drizzle with the remaining 2 tablespoons oil; toss to mix. Season the pork and potatoes with salt and pepper. Bake for 30-40 minutes or until pork reaches an internal temperature of 150 degrees. Let rest for 10 minutes before serving. Serve with the roasted potatoes.

Easy Chicken Dijon

Tuesday, January 13th, 2009

This recipe is another one of those healthy ones–it’s from the most recent Weight Watchers Magazine. The recipe calls for chicken drumsticks, with the skin removed, but I used boneless, skinless chicken breasts; it’s pretty much all we stock around here. I also substituted “Mustard Girl” American Dijon Mustard (a very nice, flavorful mustard we found at Whole Foods on our last trip there–I’m anxious to try some of the other flavors), for the whole grain Dijon mustard the recipe called for. The mustard actually makes a pretty good substitute for a traditional breading. The chicken was crispy, in part due to the mustard (which in addition to being healthy and tasty, didn’t make the breading soggy at all) and in part due to the panko bread crumbs.

If you’ve never used panko before, they’re a special kind of japanese bread crumb that are more like bread flakes. They’re extra crunchy, and you can find them at just about any grocery store. They’re working their way towards mainstream, so you might find them with the stuffing and other bread crumb items, but if you don’t see them there, check with the asian foods. I’ll bet your store stocks them.

img_1415

Easy Chicken Dijon
Adapted from Weight Watchers Magazine

  • 8 chicken drumsticks, skinned (about 2 lbs) — (I used 1 pound of boneless skinless chicken breasts instead)
  • 3 Tbsp. whole-grain Dijon mustard
  • 2/3 c. panko bread crumbs
  • 1 1/2 tsp. dried herbs (such as tarragon, oregano, or thyme) — (I used oregano)
  • salt and pepper

1. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper or foil and lightly spray with nonstick spray.

2. Brush the drumsticks with the mustard. Mix the bread crumbs, herbs, salt, and pepper in a large zip-top plastic bag, add the drumsticks. Squeeze out the air an seal the bag, turn to coat the drumsticks.

3. Place the drumsticks on the prepared baking sheet and lightly spray with nonstick spray. Bake until browned and cooked through, 35-40 minutes, spraying the drumsticks with non-stick spray halfway through the baking time. Let stand about 5 minutes before serving.

Note: Be sure the chicken is dry (just pat it down with a paper towel) before you try to bread it, otherwise, it might get soggy on you. This recipe is mostly a method and could be changed quite a bit by changing up the seasonings. I skipped the whole shake and bake routine and just put out the crumbs in a pie tin to bread the chicken, but I guess the ziploc bag method will save you a dish or two.

This actually turned out a lot like that Paula Deen “Chicken Sticks” recipe but was much, much healthier. Nothing earth-shattering here, but I might make it again. It was certainly quick and easy! Next time, I might add a little bit of honey to the mustard before breading the chicken.

Mustard Roasted Fish

Thursday, January 1st, 2009

David and I are not normally fish eaters. Sometimes we think we’d like to be–and we’ll both enjoy restaurant Fish & Chips from time to time, but fish is not normally something I make at home.

The success of the previous Barefoot Contessa recipe, Coq au Vin, and the desire to be people who actually eat fish led to me making Ina Garten’s Mustard Roasted Fish for dinner this week. I served it with Skillet Smashed Potatoes from 101 cookbooks.

The fish was easy enough to cook, and the sauce was creamy and tangy. The first couple of bites were impressive, but somehow, David and I both lost interest in the dish pretty quickly. It was a nice recipe, and maybe people who enjoy fish more than we do would enjoy it more. One of these times, I’ll remember that we don’t really like fish!

img_1380

Mustard Roasted Fish
From the Barefoot Contessa: Back to Basics cookbook. Serves 4

  • 4 (8 ounce) fish fillets such as red snapper (tilapia was what we used)
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 8 ounces creme fraiche
  • 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon whole-grain mustard
  • 2 tablespoons minced shallots
  • 2 teaspoons drained capers

1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

2. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper. Place the fish fillets skin side down on the sheet pan. Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper.

3. Combine the creme fraiche, two mustards, shallots, capers, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper in a small bowl. Spoon the sauce evenly over the fish, making sure the fish is completely covered. Bake for 10-15 minutes, depending on the thickness of the fish, until it’s barely done. Be sure not to overcook it! Serve hot or at room temperature with the sauce form the pan spooned over the top.

Note: Even though David and I were not huge fans of this recipe, our friend Leah liked it a lot, even though she is not a big fan of mustard. She likes fish a lot, an was impressed with this preparation. Because she doesn’t like mustard, I baked her a “safer” fish with olive oil, lemon pepper, and garlic, and she liked that, but she loved the mustard roasted fish.

I probably won’t make this again, but that doesn’t mean it’s not worth making if you do like fish.

Skillet Smashed Potatoes

  • one small bag of small potatoes (I used Russian fingerling potatoes, but baby yukon golds or baby reds could work here )
  • salt & pepper
  • 1 – 2 tablespoons olive oil

Start by placing the potatoes in a large saucepan. Add a teaspoon of salt and cover with water. Don’t peel the potatoes, because the skin helps keep the potatoes together. Bring the water to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat and cook at a low boil until they are tender enough to slide a knife in easily. It is important not to over-boil them, for golf ball size potatoes about 10 minutes or a little less. Drain the potatoes.

Heat the olive in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Keep in mind it needs to be big enough to hold the potatoes, which double in size when they are smashed. Smash each potato with a masher or the bottom of a heavy glass. Season with salt and pepper and cook until crisp, and them turn and cook the other side. Sprinkle with chives, fresh herbs, or any seasonings you like and serve.

Note: These were good, but not great. They turned out mostly like fried potatoes, which are good, but a lot less work than par-boiling and smashing them and all that, so I’d probably just fry the potatoes the next time.