Posts Tagged ‘breakfast’

Peanut Butter Banana Bread

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

Cooking Light magazine recently had a feature on Banana Bread recipes.

I frequently have a freezer full of too-ripe bananas, just waiting to be turned into Banana Bread. (This has never been more true than lately; I think we’ve got about 12 frozen bananas in there!) I have an old standby recipe for banana bread from David’s family, and I’ve made other types of banana bread before, but I was excited to try some of the Cooking Light varieties, especially after seeing their outstanding reviews. The first one to catch my eye was this Peanut Butter Banana Bread.

I’ll admit, I made some tweaks. For one, I didn’t have chopped peanuts, or creamy peanut butter, so I cut out the middle man and used chunky peanut butter. Worked great. I’m not a fan of super-sweet desserts, usually, and Banana Bread is more of a breakfast treat to me than it is a dessert anyway, so I skipped the extra sweetness from the peanut butter glaze, though I’m sure it would’ve been tasty. I liked the way it turned out. Moist, rich-but-not-too-rich, with just a hint of peanuty goodness. The peanut butter added flavor without overpowering the bananas. The most successful Cooking Light recipes are ones that don’t seem “light,” and this definitely falls into that category. I’ll probably make this one again–if I was making it to give to someone else or to bring to a party or something, I’d probably try the glaze, too.

Peanut Butter Banana Bread
Adapted from Cooking Light, October 2010

For the Bread:

  • 1 1/2  cups  mashed ripe banana
  • 1/3  cup  vanilla fat-free yogurt
  • 1/3  cup  crunchy peanut butter
  • 3  tablespoons  butter, melted
  • 2  large eggs
  • 1/2  cup  granulated sugar
  • 1/2  cup  packed brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups  all-purpose flour (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 3/4  teaspoon  baking soda
  • 1/2  teaspoon  salt
  • 1/2  teaspoon  ground cinnamon
  • 1/8  teaspoon  ground allspice
  • Cooking spray

For the Glaze (optional):

  • 1/3  cup  powdered sugar
  • 1  tablespoon  1% low-fat milk
  • 1  tablespoon  creamy peanut butter

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 350°.

2. To prepare bread, combine first 5 ingredients in a large bowl; beat with a mixer at medium speed. Add granulated and brown sugars; beat until blended.

3. Weigh or lightly spoon flour into dry measuring cups; level with a knife. Combine flour and next 5 ingredients (through allspice) in a small bowl. Add flour mixture to banana mixture; beat just until blended. Pour batter into a standard 9 x 5-inch loaf pan coated with cooking spray. Bake at 350° for 1 hour and 5 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Remove from oven; cool 10 minutes in pan on a wire rack. Remove bread from pan; cool.

4. If you want to make the glaze: combine powdered sugar, milk, and 1 tablespoon creamy peanut butter in a small bowl, stirring with a whisk. Drizzle glaze over bread when cooled.

Nutritional Info: Calories: 198; Fat: 7.4g; Protein: 4.7g; Carbohydrate: 29.7g; Fiber: 1.9g

The World’s Best Coffee Cake

Monday, July 26th, 2010

That Pioneer Woman. Somebody should buy me her cookbook. Everything she makes looks delicious, even if it’s something I wouldn’t normally like. I also love her sense of humor. And how she’s not afraid of butter.

We’re eating healthier (most of the time) and so I don’t make these treats for David as often as I once did. And when I do, I try to make something that’s not too tempting for me. I managed to stay away from this coffee cake for most of the week, but I’m not sure it was due to lack of temptation. The cake was the perfect amount of sweetness, with great cinnamon and pecan flavors. It was slightly dense, and had the perfect slightly-crumbly texture. It’s got me dreaming of other things I could put in a coffee cake. So much for avoiding temptation.

I followed the directions from the site almost exactly. I don’t have a pastry cutter, so I put the dry ingredients in the food processor with the cold butter for those steps, and pulsed several times. Just enough to chop and distribute the butter, but not enough to remove the clumps. You want clumps! She recommends a large pan, and I would definitely agree. I used a deep white roasting dish from CorningWare, and the cake rose to the top of the pan. A regular 9×13 Pyrex would’ve been cutting it close for sure.

The World’s Best Coffee Cake (According to The Pioneer Woman)

FOR THE CAKE:

  • 1-½ stick Butter, Softened
  • 2 cups Sugar
  • 3 cups Flour, Sifted
  • 4 teaspoons Baking Powder
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 1-¼ cup Whole Milk (I used 1 cup of 1% milk with 1/4 cup of cream, because oddly enough, I keep 1% AND heavy cream on hand, and never have whole milk)
  • 3 whole Egg Whites, Beaten Until Stiff

FOR THE TOPPING:

  • 1-½ stick Butter, Softened
  • ¾ cups Flour
  • 1-½ cup Brown Sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons Cinnamon
  • 1-½ cup Pecans, Chopped
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Sift together flour, baking powder, and salt. Beat egg whites and set aside.
  2. Cream butter and sugar. Add flour mixture and milk alternately until combined. Don’t overbeat. Fold in beaten egg whites with a rubber spatula. Spread in a well-greased 9 x 13 (or LARGER!) baking pan. A cake pan with higher sides would be best.
  3. In the bowl of your food processor, pulse topping ingredients until crumbly. Sprinkle all over the top.
  4. Bake for 40 to 45 minutes, or until completely set. Enjoy!

Blueberry Breakfast Porridge

Monday, December 28th, 2009

I have been pleasantly surprised recently to learn that I actually like oatmeal. It started with a specific kind of McCann’s Instant Oatmeal, and has sort of grown from there to include a few different varieties. 6 months ago, I don’t think I would’ve ever tried this porridge recipe from my Weight Watchers 150 Comfort Foods cookbook.

Rather than just oats, this porridge uses bulgur and barley, which adds a chewy texture and more nutty flavor. It’s slightly chewier/bulkier than steel cut oats, for comparison. I added extra blueberries to the mix, for more flavor, and I’d have to say, the recipe would be a little bland without them.

Blueberry Breakfast Porridge
Adapted from the Weight Watchers 150 Comfort Foods cookbook

  • 1 1/2 cups 1% milk
  • pinch of salt
  • 1/2 cup quick cooking barley
  • 1/2 cup bulgur
  • 1/2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1 cup blueberries
  • 2 tablespoons packed brown sugar
  • pinch of ground cinnamon

1. Put the mlk and salt in a small pan and bring just to a boil. Stir in the barley, bulgur, and oats. Reduce the heat to simmer, stirring frequently until the milk is completely absorbed and the grains are tender, but chewy. This takes about 10 minutes.

2. Remove from heat, and stir in the blueberries. Spoon the porridge evenly into 2 bowls, sprinkle with the remaining brown sugar and cinnamon, and serve.

Note: The recipe was very tasty when it was fresh. Unfortunately, I like to eat oatmeal at my desk at work–I was hoping this would reheat well, but it doesn’t really. The reheated version is much chewier than it was originally. Even though it didn’t take too long, I’m not one for cooking in the mornings. Unless I was going to be eating breakfast at home, I don’t know if I’d make this one again. For two servings, it works out to 6 points, but I broke it into 4 servings for 3 points each.

“Pumpkin Pie” Pancakes

Sunday, December 20th, 2009

This recipe comes from the Weight Watchers Comfort Classics cookbook, just like those Ham & Cheese quiches. Can I say that this is my favorite Weight Watchers cookbook? Because it is. Normally, I’m not too impressed with Weight Watchers official recipes–they tend to be too bland for my tastes. But so far, we’ve tried the Pumpkin Pie Pancakes, the Mini-Quiches, the Macaroni & Cheese, the Oven-Fried Chicken with Sage Gravy, and the Tandoori Chicken, and all were very tasty.

But out of all of the ones we’ve tried these pancakes were my favorite so far.

These were good enough to order in a restaurant. In fact, there’s a pumpkin pancake that Leah and I love at our local brunch spot, the Bongo Room, and these rivaled those tasty cakes–for what I’m certain is a fraction of the points. The only thing missing is the Bongo Room’s amazing vanilla bean sauce. Next time I make these pancakes, I think I’d try to make something along those lines.

pumpkin pancakes

“Pumpkin Pie” Pancakes
Adapted from Weight Watchers Comfort Classics, Serves 4

  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup whole-wheat flour
  • 3 tablespoons packed brown sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 1/3 teaspoon salt
  • 2/3 cup low-fat buttermilk
  • 1/4 cup canned pumpkin puree
  • 4 teaspoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 large egg
  • 4 tablespoons maple syrup

1. Whisk together the all-purpose and whole-wheat flours, brown sugar, baking powder, baking soda, pumpkin pie spice, and salt in a medium bowl. Whisk the buttermilk, pumpkin, butter, and egg in another bowl until blended. Add the flour mixture to the buttermilk mixture, stirring just until blended.

2. Spray a large nonstick griddle with nonstick spray and set over medium heat. When a drop of water sizzles on it, pour the batter onto the skillet by scant 1/4 cupfuls. Cook just until bubbles begin to appear at the edges of the pancakes, 2-3 minutes. Flip and cook until golden, 2-3 minutes longer. Repeat with the remaining batter, making a total of 8 pancakes. Serve with the maple syrup.

Nutritional Info: (Serving = 2 pancakes with 1 tablespoon maple syrup) 222 Cal, 6 g Fat, 2 g Fiber. Points: 5

Blueberry Pancakes

Friday, August 14th, 2009

I do most of the cooking, which means most of the time, I make my own breakfast.

During the week, that means cereal at my desk at work, primarily. And on the weekends, I make myself eggs, or sometimes this bacon, egg, potatoes & cheese scramble that I really like. Maybe I’ll share it with you sometime. But that’s besides the point.

As much as I love to cook, and as much as I need breakfast in the morning, sometimes it’s hard to be motivated. That’s why, I’m here to say, I believe that waking up to a breakfast that someone else has cooked is one of the most luxurious feelings. I have been lucky enough to wake up to breakfast a few times in my life. When I was little, it was one of the best parts of staying overnight at Grandma and Grandpas house (so much so, that we’ll still ask them to make breakfast for us every now and then). And occasionally, my dad would make himself breakfast and get suckered in to cooking for everyone else on a Sunday morning. These days, it doesn’t happen often, but every now and then David will make me breakfast. When he does, it’s usually pancakes.

One fantastic weekend morning last week, I woke up to David making pancakes. Blueberry pancakes. And banana pancakes. Fantastic pancakes. He’d even had to go out shopping for ingredients–the buttermilk and the blueberries. Still, he made pancakes.

It’s probably not surprising that David makes Alton Brown’s pancakes. One of the great things about Alton Brown’s recipe for pancakes is that it starts with making your own pancake mix. Once you’ve done that, you’ve got enough mix for several batches of pancakes for later use. All you do is add eggs , butter, and buttermilk to put together the pancake batter.

photo(2)

Alton Brown’s “Instant” Pancakes

To make the “Instant” Pancake Mix:

  • 6 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda (check expiration date first)
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons sugar

Combine all of the ingredients in a lidded container. Shake to mix.

Use the mix within 3 months.

To make the pancakes:

  • 2 eggs, separated
  • 2 cups buttermilk
  • 4 tablespoons melted butter
  • 2 cups “Instant” Pancake Mix, recipe above
  • 1 stick butter, for greasing the pan
  • 2 cups fresh fruit such as blueberries, if desired

Heat an electric griddle or frying pan to 350 degrees F. Heat oven to 200 degrees F.

Whisk together the egg whites and the buttermilk in a small bowl. In another bowl, whisk the egg yolks with the melted butter.

Combine the buttermilk mixture with the egg yolk mixture in a large mixing bowl and whisk together until thoroughly combined. Pour the liquid ingredients on top of the pancake mix. Using a whisk, mix the batter just enough to bring it together. Don’t try to work all the lumps out.

Check to see that the griddle is hot by placing a few drops of water onto to the griddle. The griddle is ready if the water dances across the surface.

Lightly butter the griddle. Wipe off thoroughly with a paper towel. (No butter should be visible.)

Gently ladle the pancake batter onto the griddle and sprinkle on fruit if desired. When bubbles begin to set around the edges of the pancake and the griddle-side of the cake is golden, gently flip the pancakes. Continue to cook 2 to 3 minutes or until the pancake is set.

Serve immediately or remove to a towel-lined baking sheet and cover with a towel. Hold in a warm place for 20 to 30 minutes.

Yield: 12 pancakes

Note: We’ve made these pancakes several times, and they’re my absolute favorite ones. No contest. This batch had blueberries in some, and banana slices in others, but the plain ones are just as good.

Bacon & Cheese Breakfast Strata

Saturday, July 11th, 2009

A few weeks ago, I was in Cedar Rapids Iowa, visiting with my friends from college. While I was lazy and slept in, I missed the chance to go ot the farmer’s market with a couple of my close friends, Sarah and Leah. I wish I’d been awake, because I love a farmer’s market (though I guess I also missed a bunch of wandering around in the rain, which I don’t love quite as much).

While they were out, they picked up this delicious breakfast baked pastry thing, with eggs, cheese, bacon, and thinly sliced mushrooms and even spinach. I don’t think any of us were totally into both mushrooms or spinach (I’ll eat mushrooms, but not spinach, others were the opposite, some wouldn’t normally eat either one) but it was still delicious. It had been baked and cooled, and cut into squares–kind of like squares of a casserole, but solid enough to pick up and eat. When they got back from the market, we warmed it up a little in the oven and that was it.

I don’t know what it was called, but when I saw this Bacon and Cheese Strata on The Pioneer Woman’s website, I was reminded of it, and decided to try the strata dish.

I’m going to say upfront that this was not my favorite. Maybe I was comparing it (unfavorably and unfairly) to the baked dish from Iowa. I also think I used too much of the bready pita chips in my base (I was halving the recipe, and I didn’t measure the chips so I overestimated what I would need). Then there was the issue of cooking–again a problem with halving the recipe, I guess, but when it looked like the eggs were set at the edges, I cut into it and found raw egg. By the time I was sure the eggs were done, the outside edges were rubbery and overcooked. All in all, I would not call this a success, but I think I might try it again sometime. There’s definitely potential here.

strata

Bacon & Cheese Breakfast Strata
Adapted from The Pioneer Woman Cooks

  • 6 slices bacon, cut into 1/2 piece
  • 4 eggs, beaten
  • 1/4 cup half & half
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 4 ounces cream cheese
  • 1/2 cup grated cheddar cheese (I used Tillamook Extra Sharp White Cheddar Cheese)
  • 5 ounces Stacy’s Simply Naked Pita Chips

1. Fry the bacon pieces in a large skillet until done but not overly crispy and Drain on a plate lined with paper towels.

2. Mix eggs, half & half, salt, and pepper in a small bowl.

3. Arrange pita chips in an 8 x8-inch baking dish. Slightly press to flatten.

4. Tear pieces of cream cheese and evenly distribute over the top.

5. Sprinkle the bacon pieces over the top, followed by the cheddar cheese.

6. Pour egg mixture evenly over all ingredients.

7. Place into the fridge for several hours or overnight (makes a handy breakfast casserole!), then bake at 325 degrees for 20 minutes or until eggs are set. Cut into squares and serve immediately.

Burg’s French Toast

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2009

When I wrote about Molly Wizenberg’s new book, A Homemade Life, I mentioned that reading the book inspired me to get into the kitchen immediately and start cooking. There’s no better example of that than the Saturday morning that I hopped out of bed, where I was spending a lazy morning reading, to make Burg’s French Toast.

For the most part, this is a basic french toast recipe. Nothing special in the ingredients list anyhow. The difference comes in the cooking method–this french toast is fried in oil, almost deep fried, which gives it a crispy coating, while keeping the inside a soft, almost custard-like filling. It was delicious.

The results reminded me of Alton Brown’s french toast, but with much less fuss. AB suggests starting it in a skillet, then baking it in the oven to get the crispy outside/soft inside. This was much easier.

Burg’s French Toast
Adapted from Molly Wizenberg’s A Homemade Life

  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
  • canola or other flavorless oil, for frying
  • 6 to 8 slices of day-old bread, cut on the diagonal, about 3/4″ thick.
  • Pure maple syrup, for serving

1. In a wide, shallow bowl or pie plate, whisk the eggs with milk, sugar, vanilla, salt, and nutmeg until blended.

2. Place a large cast iron skillet over medium-high heat, and pour in enough oil to completely coat the bottom of the pan. Heat the oil until you can feel warmth radiating from it. The oil is ready when a drop of the egg mixture flicked gently into the pan sizzles on contact.

3. Meanwhile, once the oil is ready, put two or three slices of bread into the egg mixture, allowing each side to soak for between 30 seconds and a minute. They should be heavy, but not falling apart.

4. Carefully place the soaked bread slices into the oil. They will sizzle, and oil will bubble up around the edges. The toast cooks very quickly, so keep an eye on them, flipping them every one or two minutes.

5. Remove to a plate lined with a paper towel and allow to sit for a minute or two before serving. Repeat with the remaining bread. Serve french toast hot with pure maple syrup.

Note: Molly recommends using “French Bread” with a soft, light crumb and thin crisp crust. And for half of the french toast, that’s exactly what I used. But for the other half, I used leftover (slightly stale) hamburger buns. I used a bread knife to very lightly trim the crusty top and bottoms off of the bun, and it worked surprisingly well.

I’m also indebted to Leah’s parents, who sent her real Maple syrup from their own trees, and to Leah, for being kind enough to share it!

Peaches & Cream Steel Cut Oats

Wednesday, May 6th, 2009

I’m not going to say that oatmeal is my favorite thing to eat for breakfast. And I’m not going to say that this recipe for steel cut oats has changed my life. I am, however, going to say that this recipe for steel cut oats has changed my opinion on oatmeal.

Steel cut oats are the less processed form of oatmeal. Old-fashioned oats or instant oatmeal are made from rolled oats, but steel cut oats are, as it sounds, cut instead. This changes the texture completely, from a soft, mushy cereal, to a nutty, slightly chewy bowl of oats. Really, steel cut oats remind me more of rice than they do the gross packets of oatmeal that I was used to.

This recipe is based on the flavors of those little packets of peaches & cream instant oatmeal, but is so much tastier!

peaches-cream-steel-cut-oats1

Peaches and Cream Steel Cut Oats
Adapted from Hannah is Hungry

  • 1 1/2 cups steel cut oats
  • 3 cups water
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup canned peaches, chopped
  • 1/2 cup peach juice (from the canned peaches)
  • 1/4 cup chopped walnuts
  • 2 Tablespoons of whole milk or cream per bowl

1. In a medium pot bring 1 1/2 cups steel cut oats, 3 cups water and a couple pinches of salt to a boil.

2.  Turn down to a simmer and let it go for 25 minutes.

3. Add 1 cup chopped canned peaches and 1/2 cup of the peach juice. Continue cooking for 10 minutes or until it reaches your desired consistency.

4) Scoop into 4 bowls and top with chopped walnuts and and a little bit of whole milk or cream. You probably won’t need added sugar because the peaches sweeten it up.

Note: This oatmeal reheats well. We ate it just one serving at a time, and kept the leftovers in the fridge for about a week while we ate through the whole pot.

Buttermilk Cheddar Biscuits

Saturday, February 28th, 2009

This biscuit recipe was one of the first things to catch my eye in the Barefoot Contessa Back to Basics cookbook. In fact, it’s been mentioned and planned a few times around here, but for some reason, it kept getting pushed to the back burner. Finally, we tried it last week.

First of all, I loved how easy the recipe was. I threw everything together and baked them all for a weeknight dinner. The recipe was super simple, but the biscuits were beyond delicious. The texture was perfect–moist and flaky, with a great crumb, and the slightest crunch of cheese on top. I also used my new fancy Maldon  sea salts to finish the biscuits, which added an extra level of tasty crunch.

Buttermilk Cheddar Biscuits
Adapted from the Barefoot Contessa Back to Basics cookbook

  • 2 cups of flour, plus more for kneading the dough
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, diced
  • 1/2 cup cold buttermilk, shaken
  • 1 cold extra-large egg
  • 1 cup grated extra-sharp Cheddar (I used Tillamook Special Reserve Extra Sharp Cheddar), plus extra for sprinkling
  • 1 egg beaten with 1 tablespoon water or milk
  • 1 teaspoon Maldon Sea Salt, for finishing

1. Preaheat the oven to 425 degrees.

2. Place 2 cups of flour, the baking powder, and salt in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. WIth the mixer on low, add the butter and mix until the butter is the size of peas.

3. Combine the buttermilk and egg in a small glass measuring cup and beat lightly wth a fork. With the mixer still on low, quickly add the buttermilk mixture to the flour mixture and mix only until moistened. In a small bowl, mix the Cheddar with a small handful of flour and with the mixer still on low add the cheese to the dough. Mix only until roughly combined.

4. Dumb out onto a well-floured board and kneed lightly about six times. Roll the dough out to a rectangle 5×10 inches. With a sharp, floured knife, cut the dough lengthwise in half and then across in quarters, making 8 rough rectangles. Transfer to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Brush the tops with the egg wash, sprinkle with sea salt and extra cheese, and bake for 20-25 minutes until tops are browned and the biscuits are cooked through. Serve hot or warm.

Note: I’m sure I’ll make these again. The Back to Basics cookbook has these in the breakfast section, and I understand that completely. They were very tasty as a bread alongside dinner, but they did bring to mind images of ultimate bacon, egg, & cheese biscuits or even some amazing biscuits and gravy. Maybe next time.

Basic Waffles

Monday, December 29th, 2008

David and I got married in August, and we’ve been planning to use our new Cuisinart Waffle Iron ever since. Of course, we both work, and David’s definitely not a breakfast-for-dinner kind of guy, plus he usually sleeps later than I do on the weekends. The point of all that is to say that we do not end up eating breakfast together very often. So up until this weekend, we’d never gotten around to making waffles.

Alton Brown is kind of a standby for us, and when we go to make something for the first time, we usually start with his recipes. And we adore his pancake recipe, among others. The basic waffle recipe, however, seems to be lacking something. It may be that our waffle iron just isn’t hot enough, but the waffles did not get crispy. Otherwise, they were delicious. Great flavor, fluffy, not too sweet. I just wish I could’ve gotten them crispier.

Alton Brown’s Basic Waffle Recipe
Makes 8 Waffles

Ingredients

  • 4 3/4 ounces all-purpose flour, approximately 1 cup
  • 4 3/4 ounces whole-wheat flour, approximately 1 cup (I did not have whole wheat flour, so I used all purpose)
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 3 whole eggs, beaten
  • 2 ounces unsalted butter, melted
  • 16 ounces buttermilk, room temperature
  • Vegetable spray, for waffle iron

Directions

Preheat waffle iron according to manufacturer’s directions.

In a medium bowl whisk together the flours, soda, baking powder, salt, and sugar. In another bowl beat together eggs and melted butter, and then add the buttermilk. Add the wet ingredients to the dry and stir until combined. Allow to rest for 5 minutes.

Ladle half a cup of waffle batter onto the iron according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Close iron top and cook until the waffle is golden on both sides and is easily removed from iron. Tip: Do not press down on the lid of the waffle iron, just rest it on top of the batter. This will help reduce the mess and waste of batter dripping down the sides of the iron. Serve immediately or keep warm in a 200 degree F oven until ready to serve.

Note: I’m not sure if I’ll try to make these again–I may do what I can to adjust things and see if I can crisp them up, but I might just try a different recipe next time. The comments on Food Network’s site show that we aren’t the first people to have this issue.

I will say that the leftover waffles were excellent frozen and reheated in the toaster this morning. They were perfectly crispy; I just wish I could get them that crispy in the first place.